CANADIAN CITIZENSHIP TEST 02

To become a Canadian citizen you must pass this test. Our online practice materials are the best practice you can get with fast results. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information supplied herein, its authors, apnatoronto.com, its employees, and associates cannot be held responsible for any damages occurring due to errors or omissions.

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Citizen Quiz 2

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Question 1
Why was the Canadian Pacific Railway built?
A
It was built so British Columbia could handle the trade of goods worth billions of dollars all around the world
B
It was built because Ottawa promised to build it when British Columbia agreed to join Canada.
C
It was built to provide a spectacular tourist excursion across precipitous passes and bridges
D
It was built so that immigrants could settle in Central Canada.
Question 2
Why is British Columbia known as Canada's Pacific Gateway?
A
It provides a spectacular tourist excursion across precipitous passes and bridges.
B
It is the oldest colony of the British Empire and a strategic prize in Canada's early history.
C
British Columbia is the largest producer of oil and gas.
D
The Port of Vancouver handles billions of dollars in goods traded around the world.
Question 3
Which of the following are the two fundamental freedoms under Canadian law?
A
Freedom of speech and freedom of mobility
B
Freedom to buy a house and freedom of religion
C
Freedom to work anywhere and freedom of religion
D
Freedom of speech and freedom of religion
Question 4
Why is the War of 1812 significant to Canada?
A
More than two-thirds of Acadians were deported from their homeland because of the war.
B
More than 600,000 Canadians served in the war.
C
The war ensured that Canada would remain independent of the United States.
D
North America was divided by the war.
Question 5
What are the three parts of Parliament?
A
Sovereign, House of Commons, and Senate
B
Sovereign, House of Commons, and MPs
C
Sovereign, Police, and Senate
D
Premier, House of Commons, and Senate
Question 6
What is a part of our heritage under the Canadian legal system?
A
Democratic principles and due process
B
Rule of law
C
Freedom under law
D
All of these
Question 7
Which of the following best describes the role of the Queen in Canada?
A
To focus on citizenship and allegiance, be a symbol of Canadian sovereignty, and a guardian of constitutional freedoms
B
To run the federal government departments
C
To make important decisions about how the country is governed
D
To peacefully oppose or try to improve government proposals
Question 8
What does the Canadian Crown symbolize?
A
The Crown symbolizes the motto A Mari Usque Ad Mare.
B
The Crown symbolizes that Canada is a constitutional monarchy.
C
The Crown symbolizes England, France, Scotland, and Ireland.
D
The Crown symbolizes the RCMP, the national police force of Canada.
Question 9
Who is awarded the honour of Victoria Cross?
A
The Canadian who has been elected Best Innovator of the Year
B
Only Police officers who have died in the line of duty
C
Only Canadian politicians
D
A Canadian showing great bravery or self-sacrifice
Question 10
What is the main advantage of the NAFTA agreement?
A
Free trade among Canada, the USA, and Mexico
B
Free trade among Canada, the USA, and the UK
C
Free trade between Canada and China
D
Free trade between Canada and Japan
Question 11
The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms begins with which words?
A
Canadians can live and work anywhere they choose in Canada.
B
O Canada! Our home and native land!
C
Whereas Canada is founded upon principles that recognize the supremacy of God and the rule of law…
D
The rights guaranteed in the Charter will not adversely affect any treaty or other rights or freedom of Aboriginal people.
Question 12
What is the meaning of constitutional monarchy?
A
A constitutional monarchy is a form of government based on freedom of association
B
A constitutional monarchy is a form of government in which a Monarch makes every decision regarding the way the country is ruled.
C
A constitutional monarchy is a form of government based on the principals of freedom of conscience and religion
D
A constitutional monarchy is a form of government which is headed by a hereditary Sovereign (Queen or King), who reigns in accordance with the Constitution
Question 13
How are the Members of Parliament chosen?
A
They are appointed by the Prime Minister
B
They are elected by voters in their local constituency (riding)
C
They are elected by landowners and police chiefs
D
They are chosen by the provincial Premiers
Question 14
Why is trade with other countries important to Canada?
A
It is important because trade brings prosperity and enables Canadians to enjoy one of the world's highest standards of living.
B
It is important because French and Aboriginal people collaborated with Canada in the vast fur-trade economy.
C
It is important because trade with other countries changed the way of life of the native peoples of Canada.
D
It is important because Canada is a member of the World Trade Organization.
Question 15
What is the role of the opposition parties?
A
To run the government as long as they have the support or confidence of the majority of the MPs
B
To peacefully oppose or try to improve government proposals
C
To make important decisions about how the country is governed
D
To run the federal government departments
Question 16
What do Canadians remember on Remembrance Day?
A
The Canadian victory in the Battle of Vimy Ridge
B
Sacrifices made by Canadian veterans and brave soldiers in wars
C
The Canadian victory in World War II
D
The Canadian victory in World War I
Question 17
What does Confederation mean?
A
It is the joining of suburbs to form a large city
B
It is the joining of provinces to make a new country
C
It is the joining of communities to become a province
D
It is the time when United States Confederate soldiers came to invade Canada
Question 18
Miriam is a new immigrant in Canada. What law allows her to take up any job at par with a man?
A
Woman’s liberation rights
B
Equal rights for men and women
C
Woman’s superiority rights
D
New immigrant rights
Question 19
Which eastern province in Canada has its own time zone?
A
Nova Scotia
B
Newfoundland & Labrador
C
Alberta
D
Prince Edward Island
Question 20
Which of the following are Prairie Provinces?
A
Quebec, Saskatchewan, and Alberta
B
Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Yukon
C
Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta
D
Manitoba, Ontario, and Alberta
Question 21
Which Canadian province has the largest population?
A
Ontario
B
Quebec
C
Alberta
D
Nova Scotia
Question 22
In Federal elections, which of the following are elected?
A
Senator
B
Members of Parliament
C
The Premier
D
The Prime Minister
Question 23
What is the voting procedure in Canada?
A
Voting is completed On-line
B
Voting is completed by Open Ballots
C
Voting is completed by all of the methods
D
Voting is completed by Secret Ballots
Question 24
Which of the following is NOT a responsibility of Canadian citizens?
A
Obeying the law
B
Taking responsibility for oneself and one's family
C
Voting in elections
D
Learning to speak both official languages
Question 25
Why is the Battle of Vimy Ridge important to Canadians?
A
Canadians took part in the liberation of Italy in 1943-1944.
B
The valour and bravery of Canadian soldiers brought about a fantastic victory.
C
The Royal Canadian Military saw its finest hour in the battle.
D
Japan surrendered in 1945 - the end of four years of war in the Pacific.
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Detailed Guide on Canadian Citizenship Requirements

Anyone born in Canada automatically becomes a Canadian citizen, except on rare occasions. For those born outside Canada and seeking to become Canadian citizens, there is still a pathway for them to fulfill their dream. First, they must gain permanent resident status and reside in Canada for not less than three years before applying for Canadian citizenship. By being a Canadian citizen, you will be qualified for numerous rights and freedoms, including the right to participate in all polls, own a Canadian passport, and contest for public office.

Canadian citizenship requirements

Canadian Citizenship RequirementsTo be eligible for Canadian citizenship, you must have the following:

  • A permanent resident status, regardless of your age;
  • Resided in Canada as a permanent resident for not less than three years (1,095 days) in the course of five years right away prior to your application date. Before earning a permanent resident status, every day you have spent in Canada as a protected person or authorized temporary resident is treated as half a day (cannot go beyond 365 days). On the other hand, every day you spent in Canada after becoming a permanent resident is counted as full day;
  • File tax returns where necessary;
  • Provide evidence that you can converse and listen in French or English (this applies to applicants within the 18 to 54 age bracket);
  • Attain a pass mark in a Canadian knowledge test, usually in English or French (this applies to applicants within the 18 to 54 age bracket).

Physical Presence Requirement

To meet the physical presence requirement, you must have lived in Canada as a permanent resident for at least two years.

For children aged below 18 and whose applications are undertaken by their parent or guardian are exempted from minimum physical presence requirements.

You can also qualify for Canadian citizenship even if you fall short of the Canadian citizenship requirements for the minimum time you resided in Canada if you are a Crown servant or a member of the Crown servant.

Why you may not be eligible for a Canadian citizen

You can be considered ineligible for Canadian citizenship if any of these conditions apply to you:

  • You are presently a convict of jail or prison;
  • You are serving a jail term outside Canada or are on parole;
  • You were found guilty of an indictable offense within or outside Canada in the four years prior to citizenship application or are currently accused of an indictable offense or wrongdoing under the Citizenship Act in Canada;
  • You were or are now convicted of violating Canadian immigration laws;
  • You were or are now being probed for war crimes;
  • You had a citizenship application denied in the last five years due to misrepresentation (submission of false statements, false information, or doctored documents);
  • You are Canadian citizenship has been canceled due to swindling in the last ten years.

NB: All children born in Canada automatically become Canadian citizens except for those whose parents were diplomatic representatives of other countries. Also, children born outside Canada to a Canadian parent are eligible for citizenship. The revised immigration laws allow Canadians to hold dual citizenship.

How to apply for Canadian citizenship

There are several steps that you need to follow when applying for Canadian citizenship; they include:

  • Acquiring a citizenship application

For adults (18 years and above), an application form for Canadian citizenship designated for adults is required. On top of that, applicants are required to complete the online physical presence calculator.

For persons below 18 years, an application for Canadian citizenship designated for minors is required. For parents or guardians seeking to apply for Canadian citizenship for more than one child must fill in separate forms for every child. Unlike adults, children are exempted from three-year residency to qualify for citizenship. Once a child becomes a permanent resident, their parents can apply for her citizenship, provided they are Canadian citizens. A parent can still apply for Canadian citizenship simultaneously with the child.

  • Fill in and mail the application

Once you obtain the application form, the next step is to fill in the form and attach any supporting documents such as photographs, copies, receipt of fees payment, and any other document contained in the checklist. For applicants aged between 18 and 54, you must demonstrate with proof that you can communicate in English or French in their application. IRCC offers examples of what is regarded as proof on their site. You will be required to avail documents when taking your test and or interview.

Once you are done with the application form, mail it alongside other required documents to IRCC. You can download the application form from the IRCC website and obtain any other information on the application, including the address, from the website. If you seek to apply for citizenship for more than one person, you can convey the forms and relevant documents in the same envelope, and they will be reviewed together.

  • Take the citizenship test or interview

If you meet the fundamental citizenship requirements and are aged 18 to 54, you will be subjected to a citizenship test or possible interview to confirm you have an essential insight into Canada and at least one of its formal languages. The test entails straightforward questions of the responsibilities, rights, liberties of citizenship, governance structure, the political system, culture, voting patterns in Canada, etc.

You can do your research about the aspects examined in the test to enhance your prospects of doing well.

This information can also be accessed from the Guide titled “Discover Canada: Rights and Responsibilities of Citizenship” and is available online. If you cannot access it online, you can request a copy to be mailed to you. IRCC will inform you to slate a date and time for your interview and or test.

When you avail yourself for the interview or written test, keep in mind to bring with you the original docs that you duplicated and conveyed alongside your application, in addition to passports and travel documents you have in handy.

  • Take the oath of citizenship

If IRCC is satisfied that you have met all the criteria required to become a Canadian citizen, they will send you a notice informing you of the time and venue of your citizenship oath-taking ceremony. During the ceremony, the oath of citizenship will be administered, followed by the issuance of the certificate of citizenship. You will, after that, be privileged to enjoy all the rights and liberties of Canadian citizenship.

Conclusion

The above is a detailed guide on who is eligible, ineligible for Canadian citizenship and the procedures involved all the way to the issuance of the certificate of citizenship.